Vintage Crochet Is Easy

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I learned vintage crochet at a very young age, my first projects were doilies made from small cotton thread and a tiny crochet hook. I then used all types of yarn and many patterns to create the most beautiful items, I really love baby things, they are so soft and gorgeous. I taught students in a high school Home Economics class to do my fun pastime of crochet.
Today or presently, the patterns are obtainable for almost any item of clothing with beautiful colors and motifs designs. First as a beginner you have to learn the tricks of the trade, once learned these abbreviations and terms become so very easy. This known makes the patterns look so much more appealing, you know exactly what to do. I am going to start with all the abbreviations and terms:
beg- begin or beginning
ch- chain
dc- double crochet
dec- decrease
hdc- half double crochet
inc- increase
lp- loop
pat- pattern
rnd- round
sc- single crochet
sk- skip
sl- slip
sp- space
st- stitch
tog- together

tr- treble
yo- yarn over
Simplified Six Basic Crochet Stitches
Ch or Chain crochet- The beginning of any project is the chain stitch. The chain stitch row becomes your foundation of the pattern. Now, tie a knot about one inch from the end of your yarn. Leave a loop that is big enough to pull the point of your crochet hook through easily. Put your hook into the loop, then wrap your yarn over the hook once before pulling it through the loop. This is your first chain, now you repeat this stitch for the amount stated in the pattern. The chain stitch is the beginning for almost every pattern you will make.
Sl or Slip crochet- The slip stitch is mainly used to connect two pieces of crocheted work together. Such as to form a circle, for crocheting in the round type pattern. Let's make a slip stitch, insert your crochet hook into the first stitch at the other end of the row from your hook. Place your yarn over the hook, then pull the hook back through the stitch along with the yarn loop already on your crochet hook. Alas, the two ends of the crocheted row are connected.

Sc or Single crochet- To form this stitch, insert your crochet hook into the next stitch. Wrap your yarn around the hook once and pull it through the stitch. You now should have two loops on your crochet hook. Wrap the yarn around the hook again and pull through both loops on the hook. One single crochet is made.
Hdc or Half-double crochet- To make a half-double crochet, wrap the yarn around your crochet hook before inserting into the next stitch. Wrap the yarn over the hook again and pull it through only the stitch. You should have three loops on your crochet hook. Wrap the yarn over the hook once and pull through all the three loops on your hook. One half-double crochet is made.
Dc or Double crochet- Make one double crochet by wrapping your yarn over the hook, then inserting it into the next stitch. Once the hook is through the stitch, wrap the yarn over the hook again and pull it through this stitch. You now have three loops left on your hook. Yarn over the hook again and pull it through the first two loops on your hook. Now there are two loops on your crochet hook. Wrap the yarn over the hook one more time and pull through both loops on your hook. One double crochet is made.
Tr or Treble or Triple crochet- For a treble crochet stitch, wrap your yarn twice over your crochet hook then insert it into the next stitch. Now wrap the yarn around the hook again and pull through the stitch. You should have four loops on your hook. Wrap the yarn over the hook once again and pull through the front two loops. Continue wrapping the yarn over the hook and pull it through two loops until you have one loop remaining on your crochet hook. One treble crochet is made.
Now that you see what all the abbreviations stand for, you can learn what each stitch does to the item you are making. There are a few more terms you have to learn thus to be able to make the correct size, etc. Those being asterisks, gauge, parentheses:
ASTERISKS (*)are used to indicate that a group of stitches or steps are to be repeated the specified number of times. Such as * 1 sc, 1 dc, 1 sc repeat from * across means you make 1 single crochet, 1 double crochet, 1 single crochet until the end of the row.
GAUGE refers to the number of stitches or rows which make up a specified area. Each set of directions lists the gauge obtained by the designer when she or he worked the pattern with the yarn and hooks specified, and is the gauge upon which the directions are based.
PARENTHESES ( ) are used to enclose directions for larger sizes, as listed at the start of each set of directions. They also may indicate that the group of stitches which they enclosed are to be repeated the number of times stated.
Now to pick the right crochet hook to make the item I have chosen. It will be stated in the first of the pattern and the needles or hooks are as follows:
STEEL HOOKS OTHER Hooks
U.S. English Millimeter Letter
1....0 2.......B
2....1 2 1/2....D
3....1 1/2 3.......F
4....2 3 1/2....G
5....2 1/2 4........H
6....3 4 1/2.... I
7....3 1/2 5........J
8....4 6.......K
9....4 1/2
10...5
11...5 1/2
12...6
13...6 1/2
14...7
Now we will discuss YARNS AND THREADS, although we tend to associate wool yarns with knitting and cotton threads with crocheting, the yarn or thread used can, of course, be made of any fiber, natural or synthetic. The synthetics are often machine washable a quality especially desirable in items that will need frequent washing, such as baby clothes.
The yarn weight to be used will be determined by the style of the item you are making. In the beginning of a pattern, you are told what type of yarn to use, and the colors of most pattern yarns. Lighter weight cotton yarns or threads are usually called for when the finer hooks are used for a delicate, soft effect. Heavier ones will be used with larger hooks for a bulkier look. If at all possible, do not substitute other yarns for those called for in the directions, because those directions have been written for the yarn named to determine the size of garment. Always follow your pattern directions and your crocheted piece will turn out to be an item you will cherish.
Linda McRae is a retired Postmaster, who has a business at home. She has written many articles about the loves of her life, while working from home. This one being about her hobby of crocheting, you can find some beautiful vintage crochet patterns on her website by the same name Vintage Crochet Patterns.

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Occupation: Retired Postmaster
Linda McRae is a internet marketer, and has a business at home. She has written many articles about the loves of her life. She is well versed in affiliate marketing and website design.Linda has trained with, Ewen Chia, who has an avenue for training new associates with step by step teachings that are remarkably fun! See ya soon, with some more secrets from the best of the best teachers,Mind Power Secrets.
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