Living the Dream

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Why Nolan's comprehensive fantasy feels so authentic...

Perhaps itís all down to Michael Caine. Consider about it: adviser figure Miles (Caine) is the one who trained hi-tech thief Dom Cobb (Leonardo DiCaprio) how to get into dreams, the core of Christopher Nolan's smash hit. Possibly Caine is the puppet master behind the entire plot, a devilishly complicated, dreams-within-dreams, wheels-within-wheels kaleidoscope that catch a glimpse of Cobb and his associates try to plant an idea (inception) in the mind of corporate big cheese Cillian Murphy. Or perhaps Cobb is the one pulling threads. Maybe no one is. Maybe...

We could carry on. But who bothers what it all actually means? Inception is an astonishing movie. If nothing else, because itís the sort of movie Hollywood consents to someone make once in a blue moon. Itís an innovative, unbelievably ingenious art house psycho-thriller that's been shot on a budget that hardly any of the biggest summer movies get close to. That simply doesn't occur. But having filled Warner Brosí strongbox with The Dark Knightís $1bn box-office heave, Nolan was given the opportunity to do no matter what he wanted before going back to Gotham. It may by no means occur to him again.


As you investigate the Making Of featurettes on the Inception Blu-ray's 'Extraction Mode' - which merges them into the action at every crucial second - you canít help gazing at Nolan's thoughts and impudence. Now we see precisely where that stratospheric budget was spent. If CG had never been invented, you get the impression that much of Inception wouldn't have appeared much dissimilar. Nolan does just about everything in-camera. That implausible cafe sequence in Paris where the world wrecks around DiCaprio and protege Ariadne (Ellen Page), Nolan's team used air cannons to blow up pre-prepared flotsam and jetsam and props into the sky. As chairs fly and cars turn over, the two actors sit right in the middle of it - but in an inconspicuous safety area. Not even a paper cup on their table stirs.

Incredible stuff, however everything a slight too brief. Every featurette remains just 3 to 4 minutes, leaving you yearning a little more. No Nolan commentary also, even though he pops up over and over again all through the bonus material. Somewhere else, Gordon-Levitt hosts a documentary regarding dreams themselves, and the Blu-ray additionally packs an animated preamble called ĎThe COBOL Job'. Not a vital package - but one that in no doubt gets you glorified to return to the film and let it explode your brain all over again.


But having filled Warner Brosí strongbox with The Dark Knightís $1bn box-office heave, Nolan was given the opportunity to do no matter what he wanted before going back to Gotham. It may by no means occur to him again.
As you investigate the Making Of featurettes on the Inception Blu-ray's 'Extraction Mode' - which merges them into the action at every crucial second - you canít help gazing at Nolan's thoughts and impudence. Now we see precisely where that stratospheric budget was spent. If CG had never been invented, you get the impression that much of Inception wouldn't have appeared much dissimilar. Nolan does just about everything in-camera.



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