Benzoyl Peroxide

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Various gels, lotions, and creams are used to treat acne. Different preparations work in different ways. Many topical medications - creams, gels, and lotions - are used to treat acne. The most commonly used topical acne treatments include benzoyl peroxide, retinoid, topical acne antibiotics, azelaic acid, and combination topical products.

Benzoyl Peroxide is one of the most commonly used acne treatment. Benzoyl Peroxide-This can prove beneficial as benzoyl peroxide can kill the acne bacteria and open the blocked oil gland pores.

One of the problems with benzoyl peroxide topical acne treatments is that they can be quite irritating, particularly to sensitive skin. Those fans of benzoyl peroxide will thus be pleased to learn that one skin care company that supplies prescription acne and skin care products is releasing a treatment with a delivery system that reduces benzoyl peroxide's irritating effect.

You need to kill the bacterium that is causing or can cause an inflammation. Use an antibacterial cleaner or a tropical application. To kill bacteria you can use a product with benzoyl peroxide or Salicylic Acid. Watch your skin for any allergic reactions such as dry, red skin patches. Some people may experience an allergic reaction to using benzoyl peroxide.


A tropical application might work better for those who cannot use the antibacterial cleaners. You will find the topical applications in a lotion, cream or gel form. The topical applications do have benzoyl peroxide, but it is nor as harsh as the cleansers.

Called NeoBenz Micro, this acne treatment will be available only by prescription, which is one drawback. On the plus side, it should mean that the acne sufferer is given the appropriate strength to their particular needs. It is aimed at helping people with mild to moderate acne, and comes in three strengths. These are 3.5% benzoyl peroxide, 5.5% benzoyl peroxide, and 8.5% benzoyl peroxide.

NeoBenz Micro is one example of a new trend in the pharmaceutical industry. It aims at taking existing products and developing new ways to package and deliver the active ingredients, thus effectively modernizing many treatments. The emphasis in the past had been more research oriented - finding new and more powerful treatments rather than fine tuning existing ones that were proven to work.


The difference in this treatment as compared to regular benzoyl peroxide solutions, is that it is a time release product. The method designed by SkinMedica, NeoBenz Micro's developer, uses very small 'sponges', called microsponges. These hold the active ingredient, in this case benzoyl peroxide, to be slowly released throughout the day. It means that though acne is kept in contact with benzoyl peroxide for the whole day, only small amounts of it are released onto the skin. These amounts are enough to be effective but far less irritating.

The side effects that this benzoyl peroxide acne treatment aims at reducing are rashes, skin soreness, and irritation. Aside from the unpleasant feeling these effects create, they unfortunately also reduce the effectiveness of benzoyl peroxide in clearing acne.

The drying quality is why some users find it irritating. If you have dry skin, use a moisturizer while using Benzoyl Peroxide. As the excess oil gets removed the possibility of new acne developing reduces. By unclogging the pores Benzoyl Peroxide opens the passage for oil and other matter inside to go out and clears the acne. By killing bacteria, Benzoyl Peroxide reduces infection and also inflammation.

Benzoyl Peroxide is available in many forms such as soap bars, washing lotions, creams, gels, etc. Benzoyl Peroxide is available as both OTC (over the counter) and by prescription. Benzoyl Peroxide - removes excess oil, unclogs the closed pores, and kills the bacteria. By removing excess oil, Benzoyl Peroxide dries the skin.

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